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Thanksgiving Accessories

Thanksgiving Accessories

If you or your child is dressing up as a Pilgrim or a Native American for a Thanksgiving school event or party, we have many exciting accessories to help you get your look just right. We have many Colonial accessories such as wigs and hats to give you the perfect look appropriate for the time period. Indian headdresses, peace pipes, tomahawks and wigs will make getting a Native American look quick and easy as well. Commemorate Thanksgiving in true historical style with our great selection of Thanksgiving accessories!

Colonial wigs, Puritan hats, Tricorn hats and Peace pipes! Long ago, before the mass of immigrants and settlers came to live on the East Coast of what is now known as the U.S., Native Americans inhabited these lands. The area that would become the site of the first Thanksgiving is located near southeast Massachusetts and Eastern Rhode Island. A Native American tribe known as the Wampanoag had inhabited this region of land for over 12,000 years. These native people were now expertly fishing, hunting and harvesting crops in these lands. When the Mayflower landed and the settlers began to make their homes in the Wampanoag land, the Natives kept a close eye on them. The settlers were gathering provisions that would be needed to survive during the winter and even took things that belonged to the Wampanoag tribe. In spite of what could be construed as rude behavior, a Native American man named Tisquantum (commonly known as Squanto) came to the leaders of the settlers and tried to be of assistance to them. Squanto instructed the settlers in how to properly grow corn and also how to use fish to fertilize the land so their crops would thrive. A celebration amongst the settlers was planned in order to commemorate their first harvest. Native Americans heard gunfire and were confused as to what that meant and thought it may be some form of warfare. As it turned out the gunfire was just men out hunting for the celebration feast. The Native American’s were invited to celebrate with them--which they did. For 3 days, the pilgrims and the Indians ate together, danced, played games and celebrated what was the first traditional Thanksgiving.